Book Review


9781400205653_p0_v3_s260x420In the war of the worldviews, it’s easy to dehumanize the enemy. Opposing sides remain unwilling to compromise, convinced their position is the right one. This tactic all too often finds its way into conversations about creation and evolution.

Christians are not immune to defending our ground so uncompromisingly that we refuse to listen to the opposition, even if the opponent is on the same side of the fence. The battle over human origins comes to mind as scientists and Christians with varying perspectives on creation seek to defend the truth as they see it. Meanwhile the infighting between the faithful continues.

But there are peacemakers among us. (more…)

book coverIt’s common for RTB to receive book recommendations, manuscripts, and review copies of books. For the most part we’re unable to review them, but now and then someone on staff will spare some time to check out a book that catches their eye.

That’s precisely what happened with Melissa Cain TravisHow Do We Know God Is Really There? (Apologia 2013). (more…)

“My friends cautioned me not to write this book. They warned me, ‘No one who attempts to write any kind of commentary on Job can escape without some new experience in suffering.’ They had a point.”

  -Hugh Ross, Hidden Treasures in the Book of Job

In the years it took Hugh to write Hidden Treasures in the Book of Job, he (and his wife, Kathy) endured profound personal suffering. Some of those trials, including the loss of their fathers and almost losing their son, are shared in his latest book.

Hugh’s intent was to write on the science content in Job. Instead, the book developed into a conversation about the connection between creation theology and evil and suffering. (more…)

It was supposed to be a five minute trip to Home Depot. Instead I spent the better part of an hour with a garden specialist discussing mulch, composting, and paganism. Wait, paganism? (more…)

Just when you think you’ve got something all figured out, it changes. For instance a few decades ago cassettes were the business—portable, durable, and mix-tape friendly. Though CDs were around, they hadn’t yet gained much ground. But over time the world grew accustomed to the new format and cassettes died a slow but inevitable death. And now MP3s put CDs on the endangered list.

Whether it’s in consumer electronics or nature or worldviews, change is inevitable. And when it happens, it disrupts everything (for better or worse). (more…)

My plans that day were simple: do as little as possible. Committed to that goal, I sauntered over to the couch with casual conviction.

Oh! Young Frankenstein is on, I thought, as I scrolled through the channels. A serendipitous discovery considering I was vegging in preparation for the hectic schedule of editing a book about scientists’ efforts to create life in the lab. (more…)

The New Year brings with it a collective “and now for something completely different” mood. A closing of one chapter and the opening of another.

For RTB scholar Fazale “Fuz” Rana, it means the end of the writing stage for his upcoming book (working title Life in the Lab). For the editorial team, it means picking up the baton and running full speed toward the copyediting process (among other things). This is my favorite part of the process—not only do I get to do what I love (edit), but I also get a sneak peek at the scholars’ next book. Bonus! (more…)