Conversations


460498669Nearly five years ago, the two of us embarked on a journey to take what we’ve learned from the RTB scholars and apply it to our everyday lives—the ones filled with movies and comic conventions, superheroes and literary classics. By connecting science and philosophy with pop culture, we hoped to share with you, our dear readers, how “sci-phi” can connect people to a deeper understanding of God’s creation, character, and artistry.

In these last four-ish years, the ministry of RTB has grown leaps and bounds in producing new resources in a variety of formats. (more…)

When The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey film released last year, I wrote an article about how Bilbo’s willingness to leave his cozy hobbit hole might cause us to consider stepping out of our comfort zone. Who would’ve known that exactly one year later, RTB would be in the midst of our own move?

Last week RTB took up the daunting task of relocating over thirty staff and over twenty-five years of accumulated gear to our new facility in Covina, California (just a few miles from our previous location). Moving a large group during the holidays is enough to make anyone stressed. But instead, this has been one of the most exciting (and grace-filled) times in the ministry’s history, certainly in my thirteen years here. (more…)

178809902Perhaps you’ve seen the clip, or perhaps you’ve heard conversations ‘round the Internet’s water cooler (Facebook). But here’s the scoop in case you haven’t: A few weeks ago comedian Louis C.K. offered a brilliant, albeit colorful, rant on how smartphones are impacting our culture.

“You need to build the ability to just be yourself and not be doing something. That’s what the phones are taking away. The ability to just sit there.” (more…)

157081874We all know people who tend to deplete our reserves of patience and good will. (Perhaps we’ve even been one of these folks.) I’ve taken to identifying such people as “EGRs”: extra grace required. This label, which I adopted from a guest speaker at my church, helps remind me to reign in my irritability and pray for an extra measure of patience when dealing with difficult people. After all, I require extra grace, too.

Interactions within the science-faith arena provide plentiful examples of EGRs. (more…)

photoIn case you missed it, last week the world’s nerds were drawn to San Diego like metal to Magneto for the city’s international Comic-Con. I, too, made the annual trek to nerd mecca to get my fandom on. While the reveals (read: announcements) from the Warner Brothers and Marvel panels were spaz worthy, there’s certainly more to do at a con than just scream at screens.

The long lines provide ample time for attendees to spark up conversation with fellow fan boys and girls. (more…)

160937576Last week on RTB’s official Facebook page we invited people to share some of the science-faith questions their kids ask. Soon, questions poured in. A 5-year-old asked whether her teddy bear would be in heaven. An 11-year-old wondered how to reconcile Neanderthals and Cro-Magnons with Adam and Eve. And another asked whether there were dinosaurs on Noah’s Ark. (To paraphrase RTB theologian Krista Bontrager’s responses: heaven will be even better than the best things we experience here on earth (see 1 Corinthians 2:9); Neanderthals were creatures distinct from humans. Cro-Magnon is an old term used to describe modern humans (see RTB 101 – Historical Adam); and no, dinosaurs went extinct millions of years before the Flood (see RTB 101 – Dinosaurs).

Suffice it to say we, at RTB, like questions. Most people do. In fact, as RTB president Hugh Ross points out, (more…)

iStock_000012495381SmallIn the oh-so-quotable The Princess Bride, swashbuckling Spaniard Inigo Montoya calls out bossy Sicilian Vizzini on his overuse of the word “inconceivable.”

“You keep using that word,” Inigo says, “I do not think it means what you think it means.”

The same could be said about science terminology. A recent article on LiveScience.com laments the general populous’ frequent misuse of seven science words and phrases. The list includes, “hypothesis,” “theory,” “model,” and “skeptic,” among others. Blame for this lack of understanding, as we at RTB would agree, lies with poor science education. (more…)

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