CS Lewis


C.s.lewis3Today marks the 50th anniversary of C. S. Lewis’ death. In the half a century since his passing, Lewis’ keen ability to join what is assumed incompatible (reason and imagination) remains largely unmatched.

Michael Ward, in his Christianity Today article on Lewis, elaborates on the power of Lewis’ approach:

In Christ, poetry and philosophy have met together. Meaning and truth have kissed. C. S. Lewis understood, like few in the past century, just how deeply faith is both imaginative and rational.

As Ward explains, since the Enlightenment of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries we’ve been told of the supposed dichotomy between reason and imagination. (more…)

Earlier this week, RTB philosopher/theologian Kenneth Samples invited me, Sandra, and other RTB staffers to participate in a recording of his podcast, Straight Thinking. The discussion focused on Harry Potter and Christians’ response to this spectacularly popular fantasy franchise. The podcast won’t air for another two months or so, but I love the subject of fantasy literature and film so much I can’t resist writing about it here on Take Two.

The fantasy genre occasionally causes some unease among Christians. (more…)

Max McLean as Screwtape

In describing the process of writing The Screwtape Letters, C. S. Lewis said, “I never wrote with less enjoyment . . . The work into which I had to project myself while I spoke through Screwtape was all dust, grit, thirst, and itch.” Nevertheless, Lewis’ book of diabolical epistles remains one of his most popular works, as Fellowship for the Performing Arts’ successful and highly praised stage adaption proves. (more…)

Image courtesy of Creative Commons license.

Born in 1985, I’m the youngest person on RTB’s staff and a member of the Millennial Generation (alternatively known as Generation Y or Generation Next). According to the press, my peers and I are rapidly becoming known for a few generalized characteristics, such as our tech savvy, our tendency to live at home longer than previous generations, but most especially for our overdeveloped sense of entitlement. (more…)

“I’m good enough. I’m smart enough. And doggone it, people like me.”

These are the words of self-help guru Stuart Smalley, a Saturday Night Live character played by Al Franken (yes, the Minnesota senator).

Though Smalley’s daily affirmations were merely a playful gibe at those offered from real twelve-step groups, the message rings true for many. If we’re good, smart, and likeable, that ought to be enough.