The end is near—the end of one of the most successful film franchises in movie history, that is. A week from today total geek-out will recommence as the epic tale of Harry Potter wraps up. Theatres across the country will no doubt see their share of cloaks, wands, and tears. (more…)

Max McLean as Screwtape

In describing the process of writing The Screwtape Letters, C. S. Lewis said, “I never wrote with less enjoyment . . . The work into which I had to project myself while I spoke through Screwtape was all dust, grit, thirst, and itch.” Nevertheless, Lewis’ book of diabolical epistles remains one of his most popular works, as Fellowship for the Performing Arts’ successful and highly praised stage adaption proves. (more…)

SPOILER ALERT (for those who haven’t read the book. Tsk-tsk.)

What does an enemy look like? Take a second to picture it—someone who snarls and gripes, maybe even cuts others down with sharp words. Someone who might deserve getting knocked down a peg or two.

If there were ever a person who could use a hearty serving of humble pie, that person would be “a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb.” (more…)

I love it when a movie provokes thoughtful discussion. Last weekend, my husband and I spent half an hour talking over the latest adaptation of Agatha Christie’s classic mystery Murder on the Orient Express. Despite having read the book and seen the 1974 version I wasn’t prepared for the darker direction this movie took the story.

Spoiler Alert! (more…)

Image courtesy of Creative Commons license.

Born in 1985, I’m the youngest person on RTB’s staff and a member of the Millennial Generation (alternatively known as Generation Y or Generation Next). According to the press, my peers and I are rapidly becoming known for a few generalized characteristics, such as our tech savvy, our tendency to live at home longer than previous generations, but most especially for our overdeveloped sense of entitlement. (more…)

“I’m good enough. I’m smart enough. And doggone it, people like me.”

These are the words of self-help guru Stuart Smalley, a Saturday Night Live character played by Al Franken (yes, the Minnesota senator).

Though Smalley’s daily affirmations were merely a playful gibe at those offered from real twelve-step groups, the message rings true for many. If we’re good, smart, and likeable, that ought to be enough.