Max McLean as Screwtape

In describing the process of writing The Screwtape Letters, C. S. Lewis said, “I never wrote with less enjoyment . . . The work into which I had to project myself while I spoke through Screwtape was all dust, grit, thirst, and itch.” Nevertheless, Lewis’ book of diabolical epistles remains one of his most popular works, as Fellowship for the Performing Arts’ successful and highly praised stage adaption proves. (more…)

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I love zombies. Always have. As kids, my brother (also a big fan of zombies) and I would gurgle lines from classic zombie films and record them as the outgoing message for our answering machine. Our mother was less than thrilled. (more…)

As I kid, I remember thinking there was nothing good about Good Friday. I wanted to fast forward to Easter—when Christ was alive again—and not focus on the pain he endured prior to his death on the cross. But I was literally surrounded by visual reminders. The Stations of the Cross ached across the walls they lined, guiding to the center of the church where Jesus hung, silent and lifeless.

Though these figures may have been disturbing for a kid, for adults they can compel us to reflect on Christ’s work on the cross. (more…)

It’s the day Twilight fans around the country have been dying for. Some have squirmed and squealed—with Team Edward or Jacob shirts at the ready—for the long awaited 12:01 AM premiere. (Count me in that group!) Others have had the willpower to hold off ’till daylight. Whichever camp they’re in, Twilight fans are salivating over New Moon, the latest film adaptation of Stephenie Meyer’s bestselling saga.

But Meyer’s vampiric phenom is more than just a story about an average teenage girl and her vampire boyfriend. (more…)

“I’m good enough. I’m smart enough. And doggone it, people like me.”

These are the words of self-help guru Stuart Smalley, a Saturday Night Live character played by Al Franken (yes, the Minnesota senator).

Though Smalley’s daily affirmations were merely a playful gibe at those offered from real twelve-step groups, the message rings true for many. If we’re good, smart, and likeable, that ought to be enough.